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o Probation and parole agencies with specialized caseloads were more likely to report use of such community-safety approaches as emphasis on after-hours monitoring of offenders and an orientation focusing on victim protection.

o More than 80 percent of probation and parole respondents stated that mental health treatment is mandated for sex offenders under community supervision.

Series: NIJ Research in Brief Published: January 1997 31 pages 52,474 bytes U. Department of Justice Office of Justice Programs National Institute of Justice National Institute of Justice Research in Brief Jeremy Travis, Director January 1997 ------------------------------ Issues and Findings Discussed in this Brief: Results of a national telephone survey identifying how probation and parole agencies managed adult sex offenders and a description of a model management process for containing sex offenders serving community sentences.

The model process evolved from insights gleaned from field research in six States.

Many persons convicted of sexual assault felonies are sentenced to probation.

Five-part model containment process The model process for managing adult sex offenders in the community is a containment approach that seeks to hold offenders accountable through the combined use of both offenders' internal controls and external control measures (such as the use of the polygraph and relapse prevention plans).In many States, victim and family outrage is fueling legislation requiring registration of convicted sex offenders with law enforcement agencies, and enactment of community notification and sexual predator laws.What is being done to manage sex offenders in the community to contain them and thereby protect victims and the public?Consistent with the clinical treatment literature and with dozens of local protocols developed for managing cases of sexual assault, the model process consists of five components, discussed below: an overall philosophy and goal of community and victim safety, sex offender-specific containment strategies, interagency and interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent public policies, and quality control. Overall philosophy and goal: community and victim safety.At the heart of the model process is a philosophy that values public safety, victim protection, and reparation for victims as the paramount objectives of sex offender management.------------------------------- Managing Adult Sex Offenders in the Community -- A Containment Approach by Kim English, Suzanne Pullen, and Linda Jones Of the many factors that underscore the critical importance of effectively managing sex offenders on probation, parole, or under other forms of community supervision, none is more compelling than the devastating trauma[1] visited on victims of sexual assault.Such trauma falls disproportionately on children under age 18 if data obtained in 1991 from sex offenders in State prisons are any indication: about two-thirds of them committed their crimes against children under age 18, with about 58 percent being under age 13.[2] Less than 10 percent of the inmates incarcerated for sexual assault of children reported that victims had been strangers to them.[3] Components of the trauma associated with sexual assault include shame, self-blame, fear, developmental crises, posttraumatic stress disorder, and the threat or actuality of physical violence, terror, and injury.Whenever possible, the perpetrator rather than the victim is removed from the home in cases of incest.Confidentiality is limited, and information is shared freely among the management team.The accelerating influx of sex offenders into the criminal justice system further heightens the need for effective sex offender supervision and management practices, both in and out of prisons.The number of adults convicted annually of rape, child molestation, or other forms of sexual assault and sentenced to State prisons more than doubled between 1980 (8,000) and 1992 (19,100, almost 5 percent of all State prison admissions that year).[6] State prisons held 20,500 sex offenders in 1980, 75,900 in 1992, 81,100 in 1993, and 88,100 in 1994.[7] The majority will return to the community, many under supervision by parole officers.

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