Adult sex community

Research sponsored by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and conducted by the Colorado Division of Criminal Justice addressed those questions through (1) a national telephone survey of 732 probation and parole supervisors and (2) field research in six States (see "Research Methods").

The telephone survey focused on identifying how probation and parole agencies managed adult sex offenders (see "Telephone Survey: Selected Findings").

o Other aspects of the process are (1) collaborative strategies relying on intra-agency, interagency, and interdisciplinary teams to develop a unified approach to sex offender management; (2) consistent public policies supportive of sex offender-specific containment practices; and (3) quality control measures that include monitoring and evaluation to guide continuous improvement in sex offender management.

Target audience: Probation and parole officers and supervisors, treatment providers, victim services personnel, law enforcement officials, prosecutors, judges, social services personnel, State and local policymakers.

Many persons convicted of sexual assault felonies are sentenced to probation.

The distinctive characteristics of sex offenders and the unique trauma they inflict require use of more than routine, one-size-fits-all methods of supervision.

o Probation and parole agencies with specialized caseloads were more likely to report use of such community-safety approaches as emphasis on after-hours monitoring of offenders and an orientation focusing on victim protection.

o More than 80 percent of probation and parole respondents stated that mental health treatment is mandated for sex offenders under community supervision.

In this sample of 561 voluntary subjects, about 54 percent reported having at least two paraphilias; 20 percent participated in deviant behavior without regard to victim gender; and 23.3 percent reported offending against both family and nonfamily victims.[17] Knowledge of the actual dynamics of sex offending is not widespread, but the public's awareness of sex offenders is increasing and is often manifested as outrage at particularly heinous sexual assaults, especially those committed by offenders under community supervision.

Consistent with the clinical treatment literature and with dozens of local protocols developed for managing cases of sexual assault, the model process consists of five components, discussed below: an overall philosophy and goal of community and victim safety, sex offender-specific containment strategies, interagency and interdisciplinary collaboration, consistent public policies, and quality control. Overall philosophy and goal: community and victim safety.

At the heart of the model process is a philosophy that values public safety, victim protection, and reparation for victims as the paramount objectives of sex offender management.

Field research uncovered specific, targeted methods for managing sex offenders and led to insights that culminated in a detailed proposal -- a model containment process -- for the management of adult sex offenders serving community sentences.

Five-part model containment process The model process for managing adult sex offenders in the community is a containment approach that seeks to hold offenders accountable through the combined use of both offenders' internal controls and external control measures (such as the use of the polygraph and relapse prevention plans).

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