The widow's guide to sex and dating

Personally I love this book..is what it promises to be - an unpretentious, funny, quirky, good read.I'm slightly baffled by some of the other reviews and can only think that the disappointment stems from mismanaged expectations.Underneath the fictional story, she also addressed what I suspect are some timeless truths of dealing with being widowed.I recognized some of what she discussed from talks I had with my mother and she was widowed almost sixty years ago now. Having been involved in this discussion of #Bookgate today, made me particularly sensitive to what Carole said about writing and how she feels about it.

There is even a scene totally ripped off from "Sex and the City" that is an homage to "The Way We Were".Equal parts The Widow's Guide to Sex and Dating is Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker hell-bent on recapturing a kind of passionate love she never really had Claire Byrne is a quirky and glamorous 34-year-old Manhattanite and the wife of a famous, slightly older man.Equal parts Alfred Kinsey and Warren Beatty, Charlie is pompous yet charming, supportive yet unfaithful; he’s a firm believer that sex and love can’t coexist for long, and he does little to hide his affairs.However, here that skill is used to absolutely no end.The plot, engaging and amusing at the start of the novel, quickly turns flimsy, then flimsier, then ultimately gets buried under a pile of lovely words.What remains, (tsk) then, is a few hundred pages of lovely noise, the sense that nothing has happened, and profound relief that you no longer have to waste the psychic energy necessary to make yourself try and care about the gossamer excuses for human beings that Radziwill maneuvers about a tissue paper New York.I really enjoy Carole on "The Real Housewives of NYC" and I absolutely loved her memoir. It made me wish I had something next to me to barf into when I was finished. A completely unsympathetic character's husband dies. She spends 100 pages not really caring about his death and deciding she didn't really love him for no real reason at all.What that leaves us with is mostly the heroine's interior monologue, which is perfectly fine if you have a well crafted character with interesting things to say. A flimsy device on which to hang flimsy thoughts, and no matter how nicely Radziwill expresses those thoughts, their absolute lack of substance cannot be escaped.(the other characters are similarly insubstantial -- I actually put down the book and thought "those characters did not exist," not because they are fictional, but because there was absolutely nothing to them).The Widow's Guide to Sex and Datingis Carole Radziwill's deliciously smart comedy about a famously widowed young New Yorker hell-bent on recapturing a kind of passionate love she never really had Claire Byrne is a quirky and glamorous 34-year-old Manhattanite and the wife of a famous, slightly older man.Her husband, Charlie, is a renowned sexologist and writer.

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  1. But sitting across from her now is "hardluvnman," and he seems different—sensitive, honest, and hot! And while he could really go for this smart, sexy woman with the killer bod—if that's the only thing "killer" about her—he knows he needs to wine and dine her and discover the truth.